Clare College Cambridge

Psychological and Behavioural Sciences

Link to University Subject Page

Psychological and Behavioural Sciences (PBS) gives you the opportunity to study cognitive, social, developmental and biological psychology within the broader context of the behavioural sciences. It links subjects which are taught by the Department of Psychology (and shared with the Natural Sciences Tripos) and by the Faculty of Human, Social and Political Science.

In the first year students study the basics of psychological and biological sciences, along with two optional papers. Those interested in the biological side of psychology will probably choose to study Evolution and Behaviour (a topic shared with the NST) and Biological Anthropology (a topic shared with HSPS). 

Those interested in the Sociological aspects of psychology may choose to study subjects such as social anthropology and sociology (shared with HSPS) in the first year. Some candidates may wish to consider combining psychology with papers from the Philosophical Tripos.

After the first year, PBS offers candidates the ability to combine the study of core topics within Psychology with those papers that most suit their interests, whether that is the neurobiological basis of cognition and emotion, the history of philosophy of psychology and psychiatry,  or the development of gender roles within society. Clare has a teaching fellowship that is suited to support and encourage students in all of these areas.

Course website

Admissions

Candidates for PBS will take a pre-interview assessment in November. Further details are available on the University web pages and on the university PBS webpage. No specific A-level subjects are required for PBS, but mathematics and science subjects will be useful. Typical offers for PBS will be A*AA for candidates taking A-levels. 

Clare College Fellows and Research Associates connected with Psychological and Behavioural Sciences

Dr Rory Devine  Director of Studies
Professor Nicola Clayton
, Professor of Comparative Cognition Psychology
Professor Lorraine Tyler, MRC Research Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience
Dr Meredith Shafto